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Institute of Democracy and Cooperation

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Institut de la Démocratie et de la Coopération
Logo-IDC.gif
Description Website
Slogan ?
Available language(s) French, english, russian
Launched 2008
Current status active
More info
Owner John Laughland
Created by Natalia Narotchniskaya
URL idc-europe.org

The Institute of Democracy and Cooperation (russ. Институт демократии и сотрудничества, french Institut de la Démocratie et de la Coopération) is a think tank[wp] with offices in Moscow, Paris and New York. It was founded in 2008 by a Russian lawyer, Anatoly Kucherena[wp], and is funded by Russian NGOs[wp] and private businesses.[1] It was set up to gain a hearing for Russian positions on global human rights and democracy, and to expose what it perceives as double standards by the West in this area. It publishes reports and invites speakers to speak.[2] The Institute's Paris office is headed by historian and former parliamentarian Natalia Narochnitskaya, while the New York office is headed by political scientist Andranik Migranyan[wp]. Philosopher and historian John Laughland is Director of Studies in Paris. At the time of the institute's founding, Anatoly Kucherena said "We're not just planning to criticize the West". He said he hoped the institute's work would create healthy dialogue with Western human-rights and democracy advocates.[3]

Focus

The Institute studies democracy and human rights in Europe and the United States and promotes the ideal of sovereignty and non-interference[wp]. It describes its aims as being

Quote: «part of the debate about the relationship between state sovereignty and human rights; about East-West relations and the place of Russia in Europe; about the role of non-governmental organisations in political life; about the interpretation of human rights and the way they are applied in different countries; and about the way in which historical memory is used in contemporary politics.»

It describes its outlook on human rights and international relations as "broadly conservative", referring to its emphasis on the nation-state as the best framework for the realisation of human rights and a belief that "humanitarian intervention" is often counter-productive.[4]


Das Institut für Demokratie und Zusammenarbeit (russ. Институт демократии и сотрудничества, french Institut de la Démocratie et de la Coopération) ist eine Denkfabrik mit Sitz in Moskau und Filialen in Paris und New York. Es wurde im Januar 2008 mit dem Ziel gegründet, die Lage der Menschenrechte in den Vereinigten Staaten und anderen westlichen Staaten zu beobachten.

Leiterin der Pariser Filiale ist die ehemalige Duma-Abgeordnete Natalia Narotschnizkaja, Leiter der New Yorker Filiale ist Andranik Migranjan[wp].

Das Institut wird nach eigenen Angaben überwiegend durch Spenden aus Russland finanziert und gilt nach Darstellung der staatlich-russischen Russia Beyond the Headlines[wp] als regierungsnah.[5][6]


The Institute of Democracy and Cooperation is a think-tank based in Paris and funded by Russian private donors. It aims to be part of the debate about the relationship between state sovereignty and human rights; about East-West relations and the place of Russia in Europe; about the role of non-governmental organisations in political life; about the interpretation of human rights and the way they are applied in different counties; and about the way in which historical memory is used in contemporary politics.

The Institute broadly defends a conservative outlook on human rights and international relations. It believes that the nation-state is the best framework for the realisation of human rights and that "humanitarian intervention" is often counter-productive. It is attached to the classical understanding of international law based on sovereignty and non-interference. At the same time, it believes that the political order should be underpinned by a moral perspective, and specifically by the Judeo-Christian ethic which unites both the Eastern and Western parts of the European continent.

The Institute aims to promote debate on these issues by inviting speakers to give their opinion and to share their expertise. At its meetings, it always encourages all sides of the argument to be put.[7]

References

External links