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Strategic pluralism

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Main PageWomanMarriageMate choice behavior → Strategic pluralism

Strategic pluralism is a theory in evolutionary biology that substantiates on female hypergamy, suggesting that women evolved to evaluate men in two categories: whether they are reliable long term providers, and whether they contain high quality genes. In the incelosphere, this is called "female dual mating strategy".

One particular UCLA study for example states that, "a great deal of the evidence indicates two overlapping suites of psychological adaptations in women: those for securing long-term, cooperative social partnerships for rearing children and those for pursuing a dual-mating strategy in which women secure a social partner and engage in selective sexual affairs to gain access to good genes for offspring".[1] The lack of loyalty with a dual-mating strategy begets the feminine imperative.[2]

Female dual mating strategy.

Strategic pluralism is a theory in evolutionary biology refers to the fact that there are different strategies that increase women's fitness: investment in the offspring vs getting 'high quality genes' from a 'high quality male 'who is often high status and can thus can fulfill her cavewoman desire to feel protected, which in 2020 serves little to no purpose. Both help spreading a woman's genes in future generations (a.k.a. increase fitness), but aiming too high means getting no investment (i.e. being pumped and dumped), aiming too low guarantees investment (betabuxx), but is often accompanied by worse genes.

Dual mating strategy

Some have suggested this might mean women naturally engage in a dual mating strategy where they get genes and investment from different partners (from an alpha male and a betabuxx respectively). One UCLA study stated that, "a great deal of the evidence indicates two overlapping suites of psychological adaptations in women: those for securing long-term, cooperative social partnerships for rearing children and those for pursuing a dual-mating strategy in which women secure a social partner and engage in selective sexual affairs to gain access to 'good genes' for offspring"[1]. The lack of loyalty with a dual-mating strategy begets the feminine imperative.

More recently, the dual-mating strategy fell in disfavor in the scientific community for a number of reasons. One reason is that non-paternity rates are globally very low, even though contraceptives and relaxed marital norms should make AF/BB occur much more often if it was natural.[3] E.g. only 3% of all children in the U.S. live with a step father.[4] This means the vast majority obtains both genes and resources from the same man. Nonetheless, the strategic pluralism highlights a trade-off that especially beta women face between conspicuously advertising themselves to obtain 'good genes' (whoring) vs. getting long-term investment from a man of equal SMV. It is a trade-off because very highly desired men have plenty of other options and are thus often less inclined to invest their resources into a female of lower SMV, but highly interested in getting her pregnant (or enjoying the causal sex). One can regard the entire system of state funded single moms (who are singles due to being pumped and dumped by a highly desired male) as an instance of a large scale dual mating strategy with the provider mate not being a particular male but the state itself.[5]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Elizabeth G. Pillsworth and Martie G. Haselton: Women's Sexual Strategies: The Evolution of Long-Term Bonds and Extrapair Sex, January 2006, Annual Review of Sex Research (ARSR), DOI: 10.1080/10532528.2006.10559837
  2. The Incel Wiki: Strategic pluralism
  3. David M. Buss, Cari Goetz, Joshua D. Duntley, Kelly Asao, Daniel Conroy-Beam: The mate switching hypothesis, Personality and Individual Differences 104 (2017) 143-149 (see Section 6)
  4. Nicholas Zill: More Than 60% of U.S. Kids Live with Two Biological Parents, Institute for Family Studies (IFS) on February 2, 2015
  5. Incels Wiki: Strategic pluralism

See also


This article based on an article Strategic pluralism (May 7, 2019) from the free Encyklopedia The Incel Wiki. The The Incel Wiki article is published under an unknown license. In The Incel Wiki is a List of Authors available those who worked on the text before being incorporated in WikiMANNia.